Toronto In-Home Care Blog

Feeling overwhelmed? 5 Tips to Combat Caregiver Stress

Posted by Steve Jones

Mon, Oct 26, 2015


Taking on the role of a caregiver, especially for an aging parent, is a very noble and rewarding task but it can sometimes lead to stress.  When you need to manage your own obligations and at the same time care for someone who often needs assistance, the physical and emotional toll can wear you down.  Embrace the new family dynamic as a caregiver and follow these tips to combat caregiver stress.

Support for senior caregivers can come from friends, family or local support groups


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Topics: Family caregivers

It’s National Seniors Day! - Events for Seniors and Caregivers - October 2015

Posted by Steve Jones

Thu, Oct 1, 2015


The leaves are changing colours, the air is getting crisper and it’s a perfect time to go out and enjoy some fall activities.  Seniors’ centres, community programs and health foundations are all hosting fun-filled events for seniors and the home care community.  

grandpa3

Below are our top picks for activities in the GTA this October:

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Topics: Family caregivers, Events

In the News - Bedsores and Nursing Home Negligence

Posted by Steve Jones

Sun, Sep 20, 2015


This past week, the Toronto Star reported a front page story alleging that a Mississauga nursing home had failed to meet the basic health requirements of a senior resident.  In this particular case, the Star reported that Fariza Trinos, a 30-year-old Toronto resident was appalled to find that her grandmother was suffering from severe untreated bedsores at the Erin Mills Lodge nursing home.  The nursing home was not providing the proper care for the bedsores and they were actively trying to hide them when people would go to visit her.  This is not an acceptable practice for any type of elderly care and steps must be taken to prevent this type of negligence.

Nursing homes should be safe places for seniors

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Topics: Family caregivers, Healthcare system

Five things you should consider before hiring a live-in caregiver

Posted by Steve Jones

Sun, Aug 30, 2015

In-home caregiver and senior

Perhaps its time to consider a live-in caregiver for a loved one?  How do you know that a live-in caregiver is the right option?  When is the right time?   Here are five things you should consider before hiring a live-in caregiver: 

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Topics: Family caregivers

Senior Hoarding - What to Do About It

Posted by Steve Jones

Tue, Mar 10, 2015

Hoarding-clutter-2Getting rid of the clutter in a home can be a daunting task. The longer you live, the more it seems you collect over the years. But having lots of "stuff" and senior hoarding are two different beasts. There's nothing wrong with having lots of stuff, but for seniors who are experiencing difficulty staying in their own home, clutter is a real danger. Last week we talked about why seniors hoard; this week we'll discuss how to handle.

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Topics: Family caregivers, Healthy Living

Beat the Blues with Mid-Winter Activities for Seniors

Posted by Steve Jones

Sat, Feb 21, 2015

groundhogThe groundhog might not have been able to see his shadow in Toronto on February 2, but we’ve got at least 6 more weeks of winter anyway. This time of year, winter always seems to stretch out like a highway in Alberta, straight, flat, and unending.

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Topics: Family caregivers, Healthy Living

Spinal Cord Injury - the Basics

Posted by Steve Jones

Tue, Feb 17, 2015

spinal_columnThe spinal cord is the nerve center of the body, connecting the brain to other parts of the body through nerves which control voluntary and involuntary movement and function throughout the body. Its companion, the spine, is made up of 33 vertebrae allowing us to walk, sit, lift, twist and bend. The spinal cord runs along the inside of the vertebrae through a hole in the center of each bone. The bones of the spine protect the spinal cord under most circumstances.

About 80% of spinal cord injuries (SCI) happen to people between the ages of 15 and 35, and 80% of those are male. SCI can occur as a result of sports injury, falls, diving into shallow water, and auto accident. Many of us tend to think of spinal cord injury as causing permanent paralysis, such as Christopher Reeves’ infamous fall from horseback. Amazingly, however, many people recover from injuries that their doctors say are permanent. More than 60% of people with severe SCI retain some motor or sensory function below the site of the injury, and many of them recover some functioning over time.

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Topics: Family caregivers

An Invention to Help Alzheimer's Patients Who Wander at Night

Posted by Jeff Durish

Sat, Feb 14, 2015

Teslas_magnifying_transmitter_generating_millions_of_voltsAlzheimer’s disease, along with its related dementias, is the fastest growing health threat in Canada. Between 2011 and 2031, a span of just 20 years, the number of Canadians living with Alzheimer's and dementia will double from over 700,000 to an estimated 1.4 million. Today the direct medical and indirect lost earnings costs are about $33 billion per year. By 2040 this number will skyrocket to $293 billion.

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Topics: Family caregivers, Alzheimer's/Dementia

How Do I Take Care of My Loved One with Traumatic Brain Injury?

Posted by Steve Jones

Tue, Feb 10, 2015

brainTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is different in many ways most other injuries and disease. Recovery is as much an art as it is science. The shape recovery takes and the amount of rehabilitation possible depend on the area(s) of the brain affected by the injury. (For a discussion of the effects of injury to various areas of the brain, read last week's article on the basics of TBI.)

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Topics: Family caregivers

Traumatic Brain Injury - the Basics

Posted by Steve Jones

Thu, Feb 5, 2015

Brain_x-rayUnlike the physical wounds of broken bones and lacerations, traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects mood, thought processes, and behaviour, often in ways that are difficult to understand for people who are not trained to care for TBI patients. Compounding the problem is that TBI affects each individual in different ways, and the scientific reasons for these effects are sometimes poorly understood.

The behavioural and life-altering consequences of TBI, on the other hand, are unfortunately too well known by the families of TBI patients. Personality changes, loss of cognitive abilities, memory loss, and emotional disability are all common after traumatic brain injury. Social isolation affects family members as well as the patient because outsiders rarely understand how different their lives have become.

These disabilities may last years or a lifetime. Many brain injuries occur as a result of auto accidents and you have insurance to deal with as well as the injuriy itself. (See our post on Navigating the Auto Injury Claims Process) Many TBI patients are young or in their prime income-earning years. Some can never go back to work or cannot fully support their family anymore because they can no longer work in their former occupation, so financial difficulties are common as well.

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Topics: Family caregivers